Vaccine Report

by Beckham Trigo

People have been getting the new vaccine that has been coming out, including our teachers. They have been very enthusiastic about receiving it among the current fears in the world. Through interviewing teachers, hard questions were asked: Why did you choose to get it? Were we better prepared as a nation? Will masks end? While there were no sure answers to these questions, I wanted to get an opinion. 

So, was the country better prepared than other countries? Mrs. Winslow answered by stating, “I think with the technology we have versus the technology other countries had, we were better prepared.” As our population is not all elderly, we had a much higher survival rate that allowed for better preparation. 

Now that the vaccine is out, many people want to know if it truly works, so I asked the teachers around our school, and they had similar answers. They stated that they had felt no side effects and were pleased altogether. Then I moved on to ask why the vaccine was so important to get. Mrs. Farish stated, “I want to be around people.” Due to circumstances in many people’s lives, this is a concern most have. Mrs. Winslow said, “Risks are lower” as they now have the vaccine. 

Mrs. Winslow and Farish don’t feel as if they will contaminate a student or a peer. However, both teachers think that the vaccine should be a choice and not forced. Farish stated, “I think it would be infringing,” and this was a commonly stated line between many people I have talked with.

Now for the real question that everyone has been wondering since the beginning of the year: Will masks go away after the vaccine? The answer is mired in uncertainty, and it is not an easy topic to talk about. However, Mrs. Winslow stated, “I really hope so,” and she continued to state that they would go away; she just wasn’t sure when. As 2021 moves forward, we can only hope that it happens sooner than later.

Reds United Week a Success

By Beckham Trigo

From December 7th to the 11th, Cedar High School participated in something new: Reds United Week. Student government created Reds United Week for the purpose of impacting people through recognition. Caleb Nelson, the organizer of this event, stated in an interview, “There were so many nice things said that I can’t imagine it not having an impact.” Everyone in the school received a letter and participated in influencing a fellow student’s life. 

Nelson also noted that “the project was probably the best thing that student government has ever done together.” Reds United Week distracted from the stressfulness of the last week of the quarter and tried to calm the lives of students who were struggling with finishing their work. They attempted to make students focus on their peers rather than themselves.

Mrs. Davidson said, “It’s important to see, it’s important to ask, and it’s important to be kind.”

Despite many students struggling with getting their grades up while taking the time to recognize another student, this project helped students see from a different perspective. Reds United Week created impressions not only on the students but the student government as well. Nelson stated, “I think all of us were touched by the kindness and goodness of our student body.”

Mrs. Davidson added, “They saw a need now!”

Reds United Week shows how much the student government cares. They saw that students needed uplifting, and they decided to take action, which isn’t something that is done very often. 

When asking peers how they felt about this project, many thanked Nelson because they felt happier inside. However, Caleb reminds us: “The real people who deserve the thanks are the people in student government who spent countless hours sorting.”

Kinsyee Robison said, “I felt it was a pretty good way to unite us all.” A majority of students enjoyed the Reds United Week and thought it brought the whole school together for the better.

When asked whether or not the event should be repeated, feedback poured in. Mrs. Davidson said that “it could be expanded,” while Nelson affirmed that “this is definitely going to be a repeated thing throughout our school.”

Many at Cedar High School agree with this sentiment. As Cedar High School’s slogan for this year declares, “Let’s Get It!”

A Conversation With a Former Marine

By Essie Johnson

You wouldn’t think that being a mere cashier would allow me to talk to a lot of interesting people, but surprisingly, I have a lot of funny, odd, and sometimes even heartbreaking conversations. On a Thursday, when I was working my usual shift, an old man with long, white hair and a wispy beard came in and needed help finding a few products. After I had helped him and was in the process of ringing him up, he mentioned that he was a homeless vet. “What branch did you serve in?” I asked, trying to make conversation. 

“Marine Corps,” he grunted out. I then brought up how I had just received a recruitment letter from them and was seriously considering joining the Marines myself. “Don’t,” he said bluntly.

 “Oh? May I ask why not?” I asked curiously. He took a minute to reply, as if he was trying to find the right answer to my question. 

He looked up at me: “Well, they’ll use and abuse ya just like me.” Once he knew that I was interested in his story, he opened right up: “I was sent out to Vietnam, drafted, I tried to avoid it. I went to college, they didn’t wanna put you on the front lines if they knew you was smart. But even with my schooling, I was still drafted. I could’ve been one of ‘em border jumpers, but I didn’t wanna live like that. Everyone who came back over from Nam had the same cancer, me and all my buddies, we all got Agent Orange. I could’ve taken the chemo that the state wanted me to, but everyone who took that chemo is dead, all the men in my group, dead.” 

At this point, he seemed to be tearing up a little, so it was hard to maintain eye contact with him. He continued after clearing his throat: “I shouldn’t even be here right now.” His eyes fell to the ground: “I’m the last one from my platoon that’s alive, ‘cos I’m the only one who didn’t take that chemo. The last one, other than me, actually died on Veterans Day last year. Something told me I needed to go see ‘em, so I hitched a ride up to Salt Lake, and I got to see ‘em before he went.”

 After telling me about this particularly hard memory, he looked up at me, suddenly with a smile on his face: “You know, when we was goin’ over to Nam, the third time around, we took a submarine. And we couldn’t make it to the surface, so we got shot up through the torpedo tube. And I oughta tell ya, you haven’t lived until you’ve got that much air blastin’ ya up like that.” While talking about this memory, he had such a look of childlike amusement, almost as if all of the upsetting things hadn’t happened. He then abruptly changed the subject: “You know, I got chased out of a town a lil’ west of here. They don’t like us, the men that were shipped off to Nam. They don’t like us,” he said, looking up at me again.

 “Well, it’s not like you or any of the other men had much of a say in going over there if you were drafted, and even then, you tried to avoid it,” I replied with a concerned look on my face. 

“Yeah, well, we all knew we weren’t supposed to be over there; we killed a lotta people and blew a lotta cities to bits.” After that, he fell silent, closing himself off again and looking down at the ground. I could feel that he was done sharing his war stories.

 “Well, regardless, thank you for your service and everything you’ve done for our country. Happy Veterans Day,” I said, trying to make sure he knew that I appreciated his temporary company.

 “Well, thank you, I don’t get that much [time to talk] anymore. I hope I haven’t ruined your day, darling,” he said.

I smiled and said, “No, of course not, thank you.”

Talking to this man felt sour, but it was also warming. I wanted to help him, and in some way, I think I did. These men and women who’ve fought for us, regardless of politics, had put their whole life on pause when they decided that they were willing to fight for us under any circumstance. The least that we can do is to listen to our veterans. 

Reds United Week

By Beckham Trigo

From December 7th to the 11th, Cedar High School participated in something new: Reds United Week. Student government created Reds United Week for the purpose of impacting people through recognition. Caleb Nelson, the organizer of this event, stated in an interview, “There were so many nice things said that I can’t imagine it not having an impact.” Everyone in the school received a letter and participated in influencing a fellow student’s life. 

Nelson also noted that “the project was probably the best thing that student government has ever done together.” Reds United Week distracted from the stressfulness of the last week of the quarter and tried to calm the lives of students who were struggling with finishing their work. They attempted to make students focus on their peers rather than themselves.

Mrs. Davidson said, “It’s important to see, it’s important to ask, and it’s important to be kind.”

Despite many students struggling with getting their grades up while taking the time to recognize another student, this project helped students see from a different perspective. Reds United Week created impressions not only on the students but the student government as well. Nelson stated, “I think all of us were touched by the kindness and goodness of our student body.”

Mrs. Davidson added, “They saw a need now!” Reds United Week shows how much the student government cares. They saw that students needed uplifting, and they decided to take action, which isn’t something that is done very often. 

When asking peers how they felt about this project, many thanked Nelson because they felt happier inside. However, Caleb reminds us: “The real people who deserve the thanks are the people in student government who spent countless hours sorting.”

Kinsyee Robison said, “I felt it was a pretty good way to unite us all.” A majority of students enjoyed the Reds United Week and thought it brought the whole school together for the better.

When asked whether or not the event should be repeated, feedback poured in. Mrs. Davidson said that “it could be expanded,” while Nelson affirmed that “this is definitely going to be a repeated thing throughout our school.” Many at Cedar High School agree with this sentiment. As Cedar High School’s slogan for this year declares, “Let’s Get It!”